TAKE BACK OUR BUSES

South Yorkshire’s bus network is broken. ACORN is demanding that the Mayor takes our buses back into public control.

 

Here are 2 ways you can help the campaign right now.

Sign the petitionTell the Mayor

Right now, private companies control South Yorkshire’s bus network. They dictate prices, routes and timetables. The result has been catastrophic – passenger numbers have plummeted, prices have risen and services have shrunk.

Dan Jarvis, the new Metro Mayor for the Sheffield City Region has the power to tame this Wild West market, and take our buses back under public control. That will enable us to cap prices, set timetables and extend coverage where it’s needed, rather than where it is profitable for the fat cat bus companies.

Dan Jarvis is yet to commit. Sign this petition to take back control of our buses!

Why this is important

The privatisation of buses has been a total failure. Outside London, passenger numbers have fallen by half and average prices have risen 35% above inflation since the 1980s. It’s a shambles for passengers, but a money spinner for bus companies who have made £billions for their shareholders.

Stagecoach, FirstBus, and other bus companies in South Yorkshire have recently announced further cuts to services.

But it doesn’t have to be this way

What ACORN is demanding

We elected our first City Region Mayor last year, Dan Jarvis. He was given the power to take buses back into public control through franchising – but so far he’s failed to act.

We know franchising is more effective. It’s how it is run in London where the market is regulated by Transport for London (TfL) – buses are more regular, prices are capped, and essential routes are protected. We want Dan Jarvis to establish something like TfL for the Sheffield City Region.

What is ‘Franchising’

Franchising gives us –

  • control over the bus network, which would mean companies would be forced to put on certain, less profitable routes and more regular services.
  • control over fares, so we are the ones that set the prices.
  • control over ticketing, which could mean one single, affordable ticket for the whole of Sheffield City Region, like it is in London.

Send Dan Jarvis a message, South Yorkshire deserves better!

SEE OUR 5 REASONS TO SUPPORT THE CAMPAIGN BELOW

ACORN: UNITING PEOPLE TO DEMAND DECENT HOUSING AND PUBLIC SERVICES. ORGANISED WE WILL WIN. JOIN THE UNION TODAY!

RESPOND TO SHEFFIELD CITY REGION MAYOR DAN JARVIS' BUS CONSULTATION

Sheffield City Region Mayor, Dan Jarvis, is conducting a survey of what people think about the current bus system across South Yorkshire (Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham, Sheffield) to see how and if there are any need for improvements for the future.

It is a chance for citizens to demand change, so as part of the Take Back Our Buses campaign, ACORN is collecting as many responses as possible and will deliver them to Dan Jarvis.

Here are 2 options - Sheffield City Region's full version, and ACORN's short version which we will deliver to  of the full consultation. All information will be collated into a report for the Sheffield City Region Mayor, Dan Jarvis.

5 REASONS ACORN MEMBERS ARE OUT CAMPAIGNING TO RE-REGULATE THE BUSES...

 

1. One, simple ticket

Right now, different companies charge different prices for different routes - it’s a minefield. Taking back control of our buses will allow us to bring in one simple ticket. In London, A pay as you go adult fare is £1.50, and you can use the same ticket if you have two journeys within an hour.

2. Timetables that work

By taking buses back into public control, we could properly plan the network, rather than allowing private companies to pick and choose routes that benefit them. We could force companies to run more services at evenings and weekends, and plan the network so bus, tram and train services link up with each other.

3. Cheaper fares

By taking back public control of our buses, we could cap fares so that travel is affordable. Right now, bus companies are making huge profits, and much of the money made ends up in the pockets of shareholders.

4. Protect essential routes

Profits from popular routes could be used to subsidise essential but often less busy routes, meaning that transport is provided where it is most needed, rather than where it makes the most money. 

5. Raised standards across the board, for workers, passengers and the environment

Regulating the network would allow us to set sector wide standards for pay, conditions and pensions, avoiding a ‘race-to-the-bottom’. It would mean workers across the region would all get a fair deal. And it is not just workers who would benefit from more regulation - region-wide standards of accessibility for disabled users could be introduced, and emissions standards could be set in order to stamp out the most polluting vehicles.